Supplementary Budget for Rising Water Levels
The government runs to Parliament to seek UGX 45bn supplementary budget to solve the problem of rising water levels. FILE PHOTO

James Dombo the acting PS at the Office of Prime Minister tabled the UGX 45bn supplementary budget to solve the problem of rising water levels.

The Ministry of Water and Environment, Ministry of Works and Transport plus the Office of Prime Minister have run to parliament just days after the financial year to seek supplementary budget to solve the problem of rising water levels in the country.

James Dombo the acting Permanent Secretary at the Office of Prime Minister tabled the supplementary budget before the Parliamentary budget committee which is chaired by Amos Lugoloobi the Ntejeru North Member of Parliament.

The acting permanent secretary Dombo told the committee that of the 45 billion shillings, 7 billion shillings will be used in ensuring the safety of hydroelectric dams.

The activities include; physical surveillance of wetlands, undertaking surveillance on water bodies and lakes and providing technical guidance on how to deal with floating islands and how to remove and guiding the removal process.

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Dombo added that 32 billion shillings of the supplementary will be used in the protection of lives and property in which they plan to get life-saving and personal protective equipment, sensitize people within wetlands, map flood-prone areas, evict illegal settlers from flood-prone areas, resettling people displaced by floods and repairing drainage structures like bridges.

The fund will also be used in funding surveillance and operations.

Supplementary Budget for Rising Water Levels
The government runs to Parliament to seek UGX 45bn supplementary budget to solve the problem of rising water levels. FILE PHOTO

Florence Adong the Director of Water Resources Management at the Ministry of Water and Environment said that the problem of high water levels will not end as they had anticipated. The Ministry had anticipated sunny seasons in January July and September to reduce the water levels but the recent forecast showed otherwise.

“We had thought that by January, July, August, September forecast would be normal. We thought we would have a lot of sunshine so that much of the water in Lake Victoria evaporates but in the recent forecast, it will not be that. We are expecting more rains especially in the islands and that will be a problem,” Adong added.

15 hectares and 40 acres of floating islands in Jinja and Port bell have so far been cleared according to Hellen Adoa, the Minister of State for Agriculture Animal Industry and Fisheries.

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The increasing numbers of water levels have led to many floating weeds and some are referred to as suds which recently affected the Nalubale hydropower dam, landing sites and some bridges and infrastructures in different parts of the country.