Bobi Wine By fighting made life easy for Museveni (1)
Kyagulanyi made the remarks on Monday in a meeting in which opposition party leaders signed a joint statement about election malpractice in the country.

Bobi Wine, the president of the National Unity Platform party, has called on fellow Ugandan opposition parties to unite and stop endless fighting since these have enabled the NRM government to remain in power.

The National Unity Platform party president Robert Kyagulanyi Ssentamu alias Bobi Wine has called on fellow Ugandan opposition parties to unite and desist from endless fights saying that these have made it easy for the NRM government to remain stuffed in power.

Kyagulanyi made the remarks on Monday in a meeting in which opposition party leaders signed a joint statement about election malpractice in the country, accusing the NRM government of continuous rigging of elections, including the recent by-elections in Soroti City East.

He said the time has come for them as leaders in the opposition to be realistic to the electorate and tell them that elections can do very little to oust the ruling NRM government.

“It is my considered view that our message is more of a revolutionary message. I think the election should be more for sensitization than for winning. In any case, we know that Museveni decides days, sometimes months, who the winner will be,” Kyagulanyi said.

But said a number of people in the opposition forget this and instead start fighting fellows in similar political parties. He said this disunity continues to make the ruling government even stronger.

“We have made it easy for Museveni by fighting each other. We have changed our targets from the enemy to each other. Therefore, we are all slaves. The more we fight against each other, the more we prolong it for Museveni.”

Kyagulanyi however, said the liberation struggle is bigger than any political party. He challenged parties to be more organized and operate on a democratic mission.

“This country is bigger than our political parties. The mission is bigger than building our political parties. In any case, one would argue that there are no political parties in Uganda because we do not operate like political parties.”

“Political parties are recognized in a democracy, but in a country where you cannot even organize as political parties, we cannot boast of being political parties,” Kyagulanyi added. 

He further called on Ugandans to join and get involved in the struggle and not just depend on leaders because they can also disappoint them.

“We leaders have made an effort to unite for a common cause, but we are only leaders, and if you don’t follow us where we are going, we won’t succeed. Please get involved. Fellow Ugandans, we are our own. You are your own. Do not depend on only leaders and politicians. You have seen politicians sell out. Think about those who were following Norbert Mao.”